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Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo

Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo

Sumo: How to Throw 20B of Mass

You’ve probably seen the 20+ billion dollar deal that will leave Softbank of Japan owning 70 percent of U.S. telco Sprint. There are layers upon layers of rationale for any deal of that size, but here are some of the common themes.

Leverage:

  • Yen to dollar exchange rate is shockingly close to a 10-year low
  • Corporate tax rate in Japan is quite high
  • Bank of Japan prime lending rate is between 0.0 and 0.1 percent
  • Japan networks and mobile user behavior is very advanced

A point that doesn’t by itself produce leverage (but creates a strong motivation for overseas expansion) is the saturation of the Japan market and the slower growth there.

Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo

This chart from Chetan Sharma (2011) reveals that Softbank is the top carrier in the world with respect to mobile data as % of total Average Revenue Per User (ARPU) and also with respect to total Data ARPU.

Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo

As you can see, the top three carriers in Japan are way ahead of the rest of the world in Data ARPU. Amazingly, Japan leads the world in how advanced their mobile user behavior is and how spendy those mobile consumers are.

K.O.: How to Lose Your Leverage

This kind of extraordinary financial leverage has led to another Japanese invasion in mobile gaming, with Gree having acquired OpenFeint (104M acquisition) and DeNA acquiring ngmoco (303M acquisition).The Gree and DeNA acquisitions have been recently criticized for example, Pocket Gamer citing Gree’s acquisition price to be 368 times OpenFeint’s annual revenue (http://ow.ly/ewGpz). Another concern that was expressed was the culture shock of the Japanese management model.

Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo

So the leverage was lost in management and operational integration as well as messy technology and product integration issues.

Judo: How to Throw from the Hips

Good fences make good neighbors. The existence of huge economic leverage is not sufficient to create a good “throw” as we can see from the Gree and DeNA case studies, above.

The Judo throw is simply for the thrower to make the center of gravity of the system (both the thrower and the thrown) the same as the center of gravity of the thrower.

In business operations, this requires good boundaries between organizations, proper management structure and proper API contracts to enforce clean separation of technology concerns.

Kii Corporation’s recent launch of its Mobile Backend-as-a-Service, (TechCrunch: http://ow.ly/ewBJ7) leverages some of these cross-border synergies. The operational approach is to take a mobile backend that has been serving tens of millions customers in Asia and to open those APIs and SDKs globally. This approach does not presume that mobile user behaviors in Japan are the same as those in the U.S. Rather, it merely takes the cloud power and offers it to the developers of the world. Similarly, the investment strategy of Kii is to invest venture capital in small mobile application developers, which avoids some of the pain of heavy-handed, cross-border corporate takeovers. As with most early stage VCs, Kii gets a board seat, but the company management continues to operate the company, as it should.

Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo

But these efforts by Kii not only take advantage of simple economic leverage kept squeaky clean by API contracts and VC term sheets. Kii also adds a layer of cross-border synergy to the mix. Today, at the Global Mobile Internet Conference in Silicon Valley, Kii is announcing a partnership that will enable Kii Cloud app developers to gain access to the 900 million subscribers in the China market through our global monetization partner, MadHouse.

So Kii is entering the MBaaS space as its largest provider and as an 800 lb. Godzilla, but formed from the strategic merger of a Tokyo-based company and a Silicon Valley startup. This approach leverages what is best in each region; separates out cultural issues in the apps via a clean set of SDKs and APIs; separates out cultural issues in management by creating appropriate equity holding relationships (like venture capital); and of course, best of all, creates bona-fide operational synergies between Kii and its app maker partners. These are some of the unique concerns about operating a cross-border concern like Kii Corporation.

Guest Author: 

Miko Matsumura
Senior Vice President, Developer Relations
Kii Corporation
Bio
Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo
Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo Leonard Grace (270 Posts)

Founder of Broadband Convergent, a Broadband-Mobile-Cable-Wireless-Telecom market website focused on highlighting industry news and strategic issues within technology arenas. Highly researched and experienced insights and trends both inform and enlighten readers on current industry convergence of Broadband-Cable-Mobile-Wireless and Telecom Sectors.

Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo Leverage: Sprint Softbank Japan and Sumo vs Judo